Sequins: February & March Reading List

Monsieur and I are hosting our first event in our apartment–February Whiskey Day! We’re excited to have people over, watch True Grit (the 2010 version, which he hasn’t seen yet), play some games, and of course, indulge in some amazingly tasty Bourbon Chocolate Shakes. In fact, I’m sipping on one right now as I type this out for you all, and let me tell ya–it’s amazing. In the meantime, though, here’s my reading list for this month (and March)

Only Revolutions, Mark Z. Danielewski

This is from the same author as House of Leaves, and if you’ve ever read either, you’ll know his books are interactive experiences rather than just a direct exchange of words on paper into your brain. Only Revolutions is pretty amazing so far, and I feel like every part of it has this lyrical, poetic rhythm. I want to read the entire thing out loud, and I often to do Monsieur. I started reading it when him and I were driving back from the big city late at night, and this book is hand’s down perfect for roadtrips.

The Influence of Sea Power Upon History 1600 – 1783, A. T Mahan

This is my total nerd book, but it’s fascinating. It was written at the end of the 1800s and it’s still very relevant today. Mahan explores the naval battles in the time period specified to show, well, the influence that sea power has had upon history. It’s a recommended read for anyone interested in geopolitics, and it offers really great insight to how Stratfor examines word events. It’s a little dry, but I’m really enjoying it.

A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan (rereading)

I recommended this book to my old high school English professor and my high school best friend when we were getting coffee last month. They both want to read it, so I’m rereading it for our next coffee get together in March. Egan’s works are so amazing to me–I’m a really big fan. Her novels cover a variety of subjects and themes, but she writes with such intentional precision that it makes you think she’s spend her entire life thinking about the one topic mentioned in the book you’re currently engaged in. This one has a really fascinating and realistic look at the future–like how the generation of Monsieur and I’s kids are going to turn out, and what technology will look like, as well as how that influences culture and society. She pulls off the whole novel without delving into the science fiction realm, which is impressive (not that there’s anything wrong with science fiction. Rather, she maintains current relevancy the entire time).

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